Eliminate the Bounce and Increase the Catch

Recently I was working with a university who were proud of meeting a marketing objective: to attract 100,000 visitors a month.  However what they were not aware of was that 97.25% of traffic was bouncing, in other words the quantity was there but the quality as well below par.


Formulas can be used to work out website conversions for example:  

bounce 2



We are driven by quantity as a measure of website success yet the true measure of success is in the quality. If we take the example formula above and remove the number of bounces to the site(97%):

 

bounce rate

The question is how do we prevent the bounce traffic which often has a cost, but has no value?  The answer is in the analytics they can provide a very clear picture of what is and isn't working on your site.  We need be able to understand which sources of traffic are bouncing, which pages visitors are bouncing on etc..

Often campaigns are driven to the home page.  We see large bounce rates on the home page as they rarely provide specific information. An example is an LLM search on an institution website, students landing on the home page had a bounce rate of 97%, students landing on the specific LLM page had a bounce rate of 44% and were being retained for over 4 minutes.

We know that semantics are part of the students search behaviour,  because of this website copy incorporates answers to semantics. What is also essential is when we are focusing on a specific market are we landing them on the most significant page?

The message is simple make sure you provide students directly with the information they require and you will have an engaged student with a much higher probability of enrolling.




Joanna Turner

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.hecoms.co.uk












                                              



                

                          




















































The issue seems to be that we are driven by quantity as a measure of website success yet the true measure of success is in the quality. If we take the example formula above and remove the number of bounces to the site(97%):




     





























































The question is how do we prevent the bounce traffic which often has a cost, but has no value?  The answer is in the analytics they can provide a very clear picture of what is and isn't working in your campaigns.  We need be able to understand which sources of traffic are bouncing, which pages visitors are bouncing on etc..




Often campaigns are driven to the home page.  We see large bounce rates on the home page as they rarely provide specific information. An example is an LLM search on an institution website, students landing on the home page had a bounce rate of 97%, students landing on the specific LLM page had a bounce rate of 44% and were being retained for over 4 minutes.




We know that semantics are part of the students search behaviour,  because of this we website copy incorporates answers to semantics. What is also essential is when we are focusing on a specific market are we landing them on the most significant page?




The message is simple make sure you provide students directly with the information they require and you will have an engaged student with a much higher probability of enrolling.




Joanna Turner

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.hecoms.co.uk












                                              



The issue seems to be that we are driven by quantity as a measure of website success yet the true measure of success is in the quality. If we take the example formula above and remove the number of bounces to the site(97%):

The question is how do we prevent the bounce traffic which often has a cost, but has no value?  The answer is in the analytics they can provide a very clear picture of what is and isn't working in your campaigns.  We need be able to understand which sources of traffic are bouncing, which pages visitors are bouncing on etc..

Often campaigns are driven to the home page.  We see large bounce rates on the home page as they rarely provide specific information. An example is an LLM search on an institution website, students landing on the home page had a bounce rate of 97%, students landing on the specific LLM page had a bounce rate of 44% and were being retained for over 4 minutes.

We know that semantics are part of the students search behaviour,  because of this we website copy incorporates answers to semantics. What is also essential is when we are focusing on a specific market are we landing them on the most significant page?


The message is simple make sure you provide students directly with the information they require and you will have an engaged student with a much higher probability of enrolling.




Joanna Turner

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.hecoms.co.uk